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    Posted: 14 Apr 2019 at 9:00am
Title: Organic
Mixed media 

Spindle turned sycamore, pyro textured, stained with an oil finish.
Top section 3D printed with Ebony wood filament, post processed with surface sanding 
followed by stain and oil finish.

Height excluding base: 31cm
Width excluding base: 7cm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote CHJ Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Apr 2019 at 1:36pm
A lot of Pre & Post Turning work gone into that piece Philip, very time consuming.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote PhilipS Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Apr 2019 at 8:05am
Thanks for your comment Chas. Yes it was a time consuming process but I do the work for myself so there are no time constraints in what I produce. Most of my experiments end up in the bin anyway.

This piece is more than just an experiment, it is the first in a new direction I am taking to enable me to continue working creatively.



Edited by PhilipS - 15 Apr 2019 at 8:06am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Dalboy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Apr 2019 at 4:10pm
I keep coming back to this piece. I like the shape and work that has gone into it but for me personally, there is too much black I would like to have seen some form of contrast.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote PhilipS Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Apr 2019 at 8:32pm
The piece is photographed, high contrast black and white, to accentuate the form, shapes and textures. In reality the piece is a soft, matt, dark brown. I don't think colour is that important in this case but understand and appreciate your comment. We have all got used to colour nowadays and forget that in the past most pictures were published in black and white with shades of grey. Maybe it was a mistake in a moment of reminiscence on my part.

Edited by PhilipS - 17 Apr 2019 at 8:39pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ian Thorn Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Apr 2019 at 10:20pm
Great piece the photo taken against the piece of A4 printing paper makes the form really stand out I think and there appears to be a lot of natural shadow . Sometime the colour on the screen does not show true on mine it is showing as a silvery black it may be the lighting . Well done Philip I like your experiments it keeps the mind working .

Cheers Ian
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Chris Smith Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Apr 2019 at 3:11am
Phil
Hey mate how are ya! great to see youre still plugging away and turning out some great stuff like this one a lot ,the black and white photo really sets it off ,any other colour on this would spoil it totally well done mate 
kindest regards chris 

dont burn it turn it
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote PhilipS Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Apr 2019 at 7:38am
Thanks Ian and Chris for your comments. 

I was expecting some questions/observations on the use of 3D printed wood in combination with conventional turning. To my knowledge this is the first time it has occurred in a posting. Silence is golden as the saying goes so I have to assume there is no interest in innovation. For a variety of reasons, this and other tech solutions will become my way forward creatively but instead of posting on Forums I guess it might better to revert to my Blog and Social Media from now on.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ian Thorn Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Apr 2019 at 8:41am
I didn't comment on the 3d printed part in isolation to the rest as it really set the rest of and looked a part of it . I admire the skill that goes into setting up the program to do this but the cost and tech skills I don't have . Even though not many comment I would suggest a lot look and we get ideas for other projects from what we see but don't copy so kept them coming I for one look forward to your comments and pieces of art do you sell through a Gallery.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote PhilipS Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 Apr 2019 at 9:20am
Thanks Ian. 

I have been turning on and off since 1999. I have never sold any of my turning or shown it anywhere other than the internet. I have some pieces given away through family, friends or occasional online swaps. I was invited to show in an online gallery but have yet to sell something. I do my work to challenge myself and, in the past, to perhaps help others to extend possibilities but I stopped doing that some time ago. When I accumulate too much it receives the final finishing treatment on my outdoor fire pit. I only keep work that has significant meaning for me or key learning points. I am anti ego and anti BS that seems to permeate the turning community at the upper end of the craft.

I appreciate that many turners do not have the income to upgrade tools and working practices. I have been lucky to receive a small legacy which I have chosen to spend on new tech. Health issues and increasing age has caused a radical change in the direction of my work and equipment which, I hope, will enable me to continue for some time to come.









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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote PhilipS Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 Apr 2019 at 2:49pm
For those viewers who may be interested below is the sequence followed in producing the 3D section.

1. modelling in a 3D program.



2. The model saves in a lowish resolution but is still a large file size - 149mb. It was taken into Zbrush to refine and increase the detail then decimated to reduce the file size while retaining detail.



3. This is a composite showing the increase in detail



4. The model was then taken into a slicing software program, in this instance Dremel which came with the Dremel 3D40 machine. The program analyses the model and produces gcode to instruct the printer on the layers involved in the print process. It also produces supports for overhanging sections.



4. I printed the model in white filament to check detail, composite below shows various views.



5. Pic of wood filament printing.



6. Final object combined with the turned section, photograph, available light which may show the colour a bit better!


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote paul finlay Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 Apr 2019 at 11:32pm
very nice piece a lot of work in this piece.
paul finlay
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote oldtrout Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 May 2019 at 12:04am
Hi Phil, I've just rejoined this forum after many years and was looking around for familiar names!  I saw this piece on your blog, it is very novel. I have seen clay being 3D printed but am fascinated by the idea of "printing" wood. What is "ebony wood filament" and how can it be 3D printed?

Regards, 
Rosemary (old trout)

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote PhilipS Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 May 2019 at 9:06am
Hi Rosemary, good to see you back on the Forum. i need a bit of time to reply, back soon.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote nicksimpson Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 May 2019 at 10:30am
Morning Philip
I was very pleased to see this piece yesterday evening and it has great appeal. The whole is so much more subtle than the high contrast photograph showed on this forum.
I am a sucker for stories and was pleased to hear the genesis of this . Who knows where these techniques will take us - it will be an exciting journey though
Kind Regards
Nick (Prof'Bergenstrauser - erstwhile Victorian/Edwardian romantic and part-time steampunk engineer)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote PhilipS Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 May 2019 at 4:13pm
Rosemary, sorry to be so long replying. 

3d printing is an additive process. CNC routing is a subtractive process. Both require the point of the tool for addition or subtraction to be accurately placed. Three planes are involved x,y and z these correlate to movements left to right, forward and backwards, up and down. On complex machines other axes may be present.

The tool tip can be positioned in a variety of ways, tool moving or bed moving but most often it is a combination of both. Gcode software analyses the model and slices it into layers, each layer has a series of instructions to position the the tool head or in this case the printing head ready to deposit a fine layer of material.

PLA Filament is a polymer plastic made from natural sources such as corn starch and is biodegradable. It is available in a number of configurations and colours of which wood is one. Most wood filaments are in the 60% to 70% polymer the remainder being usually recycled wood dust and/or fibre. Bamboo and Coconut are also used. Ebony filament, I would guess, describes the colour not the actual wood. 

The filament I have used is 1.75mm diameter, it is passed through a feed tube to a heating element with a fine nozzle attached. Heated within the range of 170-220C.

Subject to choices made at the slicing stage, coupled with the size and complexity of the model the print process can take a number of hours. Supports are printed simultaneously for overhanging areas of the model, these are removed after printing.

In essence it is probably substantially the same or similar to 3d printing ceramics.

I currently have two machines both were chosen for their relative simplicity in set up: 

1. Dremel 3D40, a singe nozzle more or less PLA dedicated.
2. Robox twin nozzle with heated bed which allows for other plastics to be printed as well as two materials/colours to be printed together.

Still sticking with PLA at present, my next project model will be printed using a metal filament, either bronze or copper when I get round to it (20% polymer 80% metal powder). 

I now have to decide which projects are most suited to CNC and which are more suited to printing or which parts can be either or both in combination, with or without turning.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote PhilipS Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 May 2019 at 6:34pm
Nick,

Thanks for your comment, good to meet you on Thursday. Sorry our conversation was cut short. Enjoyed seeing your piece in the round. Never get the sense of scale and size from photographs, carry on with these skillfully made and decorated. quirky inventions. Love eccentric both in people and what they make (touch of Heath Robinson).


Edited by PhilipS - 13 May 2019 at 6:40pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote SFurini Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 May 2019 at 7:57pm
This is fantastic, Philip - I really liked seeing the natural lit photo which gives a much clearer sense of the colour and subtlety of the finished piece. I like the infinite symmetry of the column that the 3D piece stands on, and its single plane of symmetry against the column. I think its beautiful and should clearly be kept well away from the fire pit! Thanks for showing some of the 3D process - looks fascinating. Cheers!
Cheers
Stewart
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote nicksimpson Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 May 2019 at 9:15pm
Philip, thank you for sharing your experiences with laser printing. A quick search suggests that a beginner's model 3d set-up is not expensive. BUT how long will that satisfy the creative mind?
I am a bit stuck in the HG Wells/Dan Dare mindsets at the moment and will have to re-invent myself to embrace this exciting stuff.
Do you program these machines in programming language or is there an easier interface?
Regards
Nick
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote PhilipS Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 May 2019 at 9:15am
Nick,

The choice of 3D printer is a tricky one. I have opted for more expensive versions that were essentially targeted at educational establishments so are easier to set up and operate and provide relatively  stable results each time. Some of the cheaper models require tweaking with code to perform consistent results. I purchased a cheap printer to try out some filament that may cause issues with nozzles, did one print and gave the machine to the local Makerspace where the ‘geeks’ are as interested in programming and relish the idea of problem solving, as much as the final output.

As far as creativity is concerned, this is down to choices. It is perfectly possible to download ready prepared models, some free, but for me the creative part comes from my vision of what I wish to achieve. This requires learning some of the facilities incorporated in a number of different software packages, some free some very expensive.

For me, the printer is just another tool to be exploited. Buying an expensive hollowing tool for instance, does not mean one’s creative output or appreciation of form will be automatically improved - that takes learning, critical appraisal and practice.

More expensive printers come with software that automatically converts the proposed print output into code. Any variations, such as speed of printing, print quality etc are selected and automatically incorporated into the code that sets up the machine for printing. Both my machines have reels of filament containing a chip that instructs the machine on filament choice so I do not necessarily have to programme those choices independently to have a satisfactory outcome. I always take the shortest and easiest route to success in all of my work.

My advice would be to approach a Makerspace near to you where proper and knowledgeable advice can be offered coupled with support should you have issues. I believe the nearest one to you is in Newcastle.

A free software choice to begin playing could be Autodesk‘s Tinkercad. There are many videos online to help with the initiation to this CAD software. It is pretty specific to 3D outcomes and is relatively easy to use for the beginner.

Freeform modelling is a different matter but one free version worth exploring is Pixologic’s Sculptris which will provide an introduction to some of the basic features of more expensive programmes.

So to sum up the creative satisfaction comes from an enquiring mind which you have, not the tool/tools selected. Firstly try to form some idea of what you wish to be an outcome then select the processes you need to learn to facilitate the desired outcome. Outside advice is always helpful in this regard.







Edited by PhilipS - 17 May 2019 at 9:23am
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