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A Cabinet of Curiosities

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woodbloke View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote woodbloke Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: A Cabinet of Curiosities
    Posted: 08 Jun 2018 at 11:16pm
Following in the footsteps of the late, great Alan Peters, I've recently taken a liking to contemporary Korean furniture and this Cabinet of Curiosities shares one of the main features found on this type of work, namely a drawer(s) suspended part way with a space either side.



It's made of elm and uses a 'waterfall' pattern, solid elm back panel. Construction of the top cabinet is with elm veneers (top and bottom) with the frames being glued together with 4mm ply inserts running in grooves; again very AP, frame corner jointing with doms.

The accent details are in Indian Ebony..



....such as the 'feet' at the top and bottom of each frame, as well as the door and drawer pulls. The Krenovian style door catch/shadow gap button are also made from ebony.

The drawer box is made from 2mm bandsawn 'waterfall' elm veneers and is principally doweled into position on the lower frame, using my trusty and highly accurate 'Dowlmax' jig.



The drawer itself follows the pattern developed by Rob Ingham and uses an oak rail which runs in a groove underneath the centre drawer muntin, with the bottoms made from solid elm..



...so that although it makes the drawer more difficult to make, it's easier to fit as the sides don't have to touch the frame. The drawer front, again veneered in 'waterfall' elm was glued to a separate piece and then simply screwed onto the oak drawer box.

The final shot..



...shows the rear of the cabinet and the complete pattern of the 'waterfall' elm. This piece of timber (about 2.3m long by 12mm thick) was bought at Yandles(!) a couple of years ago and I snapped it up for about fifty quid when other punters were passing it by...there's still some left for a box or two.

The finish is a couple of coats of matt Osmo PolyX with some of that really good, but bloody expensive organic wax polish (from Sweden, courtesy of CHT) over the top applied with a grey Webrax and then polished with a soft duster. It's been fitted out with six, 6mm glass shelves and the holes for each were made with the ever reliable drilling jig from Veritas.

All that remains now is for SWIMBO to sort out pole position for her teddy bear...



..which she bought from the Tokyo Skytree
The most dangerous thing in a workshop is a piece of sandpaper...NWS the 'Slope'
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Ian Thorn View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ian Thorn Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Jun 2018 at 12:02am
That's a nice piece well made no cheap materials like in a lot of modern furniture

Ian
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bat21 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote bat21 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 Jun 2018 at 8:51pm
Hi Rob
I am not too keen on the accent pieces between the main cabinet and the drawer box but overall it is an outstanding piece of work, the waterfall elm is beautiful.

Cheers
Paul
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woodbloke View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote woodbloke Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 Jul 2018 at 9:53pm
Originally posted by bat21 bat21 wrote:

Hi Rob
I am not too keen on the accent pieces between the main cabinet and the drawer box but overall it is an outstanding piece of work, the waterfall elm is beautiful.

Cheers
Paul

The main cabinet and the drawer frame use slightly different sized pieces of elm; the upper section is 32mm square and the lower is 34mm square, so the ebony accent detailing is a way of blending the two together without it being blindingly obvious that they're different sizes. I tried to make all the verticals from one piece of elm but couldn't find anything that was straight enough, so I had to adapt and overcome by making the upper and lower halves in two separate sections - Rob
The most dangerous thing in a workshop is a piece of sandpaper...NWS the 'Slope'
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DHL View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote DHL Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 Mar 2019 at 4:01am
Very nice work .
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recipio View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote recipio Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 Apr 2019 at 1:59pm
Lovely cabinet Rob. Dunno if you custom ordered the glass but its easier to buy glass shelving in the big stores and design around them. Ebony has a great advantage - it won't fade in time.I use it now for all inlay lines and accent pieces. 
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