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Sauno VT 5 - using for first time

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scoobystu View Drop Down
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    Posted: 27 Jul 2009 at 11:33pm
Hi there

I have just built a kiln based on the Sauno VT5. I am about to use it for the first time and have a few questions I am hoping someone will be able to answer.

I am going to dry ash, sycamore and elm which is going to get planked at some point this week.

What timber should I use for stickers in the kiln? Would pine from the builders merchants be acceptable?

Are there any woods that should not be used for stickers due to staining etc?

Is it advisable to dry the different species separately or can I put the elm in with the ash?

Finally. Can I put the sycamore straight into the kiln or should I dry it on it's end for a few months to prevent that nasty silver/brown staining that you get if you dry it horizontally?

It's going to be a long term experiment and the instructions with the kiln are not great. Any advice would be appreciated. Are there any good books on the subject of kiln drying timber?

Thanks

Stu
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Mark Baker View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mark Baker Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 Jul 2009 at 9:45am
Hello stu,

I use pine stickers for all my kilned items and have not encountered a problem.
I also kiln a selection  of woods at the same time and have not encountered difficulties other than needing to check the items to see when they are dry. I have found some season a little quicker, but it is but a small thing to check periodically to see what is happening. a good quality moisture meter is recommended.
I end rear sycamore for a while before kilning to prevent the staining. In fact I leave most of the sycamore about 6-8 months before kilning the wood. I do not claim to know the definitive answer to this, but it seems to work for me.
Anyone else have experience with this and any ideas for Stu how to get more from his kiln?

Regards,
Mark




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Adie View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Adie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 Jul 2009 at 1:29pm
 

Hi Stu,


Sorry no advice from me! But I am interested in the idea of building a kiln. How about telling us how you get on with your timber. Some pic's and info on how you built it might be of interest to the forum. (certainly would be to me)! Big%20smile


It's nice to have some talk other than turning! (not having a go at the turners)!! Thumbs%20Up  (Before I get jumped on) ! It just seems hand craft woodworkers are not contributing much these days, a lot of them don't seem to be around at all any more! Confused

Cheers


Adie



Edited by Adie - 28 Jul 2009 at 1:30pm
Things turn out best for people who make the best of how things turn out.
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The Baldy Carpenter View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote The Baldy Carpenter Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 Jul 2009 at 2:26pm
I'm still here!!!!
I too am fasinated that people are kiln drying their own wood.
Fraser( Not a turner or carver but general banging bits of wood together in the hope that it resembles something attractive)
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scoobystu View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote scoobystu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Jul 2009 at 12:16am
I haven't posted enough to allow ading pics to posts.

Have a look here tho, www.clachanwood.co.uk/kiln.htm

When I get the chance I will update the photo's to show it's current state.
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Mark Baker View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mark Baker Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Jul 2009 at 3:19pm
Kilning your own wood not only potentially saves money, it allows you full control over the whole cutting, seasoning to final use process and allows you to cut timber to the sizes you want rather than having to buy what is commercially viable for the retailer in order to get maximum yield from the tree and most frequently sold sizes. That said there are many that will cut to order, but it iwll still need seasoning.
Kilning is not for everyone, but many turners use the method, as do cabinet makers in one way or another. Some club together to spread the cost of the timber, seasoning and the initial set up costs.

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Picaflor View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Picaflor Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Jan 2019 at 10:49am
Hi

I am just teetering on the edge of committing to a Sauno vt5 as well after many hours of research... I have a good friend who is a tree surgeon and have run out of space for all the lovely bits he brings me but still have to buy slabs cos nothing is anywhere near dry. Seems to me like it will pay for itself pretty quickly plus we might be able to make a few quid on the side selling what I don't use.

If anyone out there is using any of the Sauno systems I would really appreciate any insights you have, things to think about when setting it up, things you might do differently etc. I am looking at doing the DIY build and tailoring it around getting 2 X 8ft boards lengthways and maybe 1.5m deep so I can get two decent size boards side by side but also have space for big rounds and wide slabs if they turn up. What dimensions did you go for? What kind of monitoring kit did you install? 

My other big issue I'm mulling over is where the moisture goes once it's out of the kiln. I don't really want to make my workshop more humid so I would ideally be using some pipework to funnel into containers (also allowing monitoring of how much is coming out). Has anyone come up with a solution for this?

Any thoughts/tips much appreciated, Cheers
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