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Drilling on the lathe

Printed From: Woodworkers Institute
Category: Woodturning
Forum Name: Ask a Woodturner
Forum Description: Stuck with something? We might be able to help
URL: http://www.woodworkersinstitute.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=22334
Printed Date: 19 Jan 2020 at 4:50am
Software Version: Web Wiz Forums 12.01 - http://www.webwizforums.com


Topic: Drilling on the lathe
Posted By: Handcrafter
Subject: Drilling on the lathe
Date Posted: 07 Nov 2019 at 11:04pm
Having made a bit of progress in the basic skills of spindle and bowl turning, I'd like to push ahead a little and try something new, so am thinking of doing some salt and pepper mills which will consolidate my spindle turning work and also require drilling. 
Any advice on this subject will be gratefully received, particularly:
I gather that sawtooth bits are good for this - there seem to be a huge variety on the market - any thoughts on some decent quality ones without going completely insane - I'm a hobbyist after all!
Any advice on lathe speeds
Any pitfalls of which I should be aware?
I've got my name down for a turning course at a local club in the spring, but (a) I don't really want to wait that long and (b) that hope is in any case likely to be dashed as I'm also on the waiting list for an operation which might then mean deferring the turning course until Autumn 2020.
So if I can safely make a start now, I'd like to.


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Check out my stuff at www.michaelforsterwoodwork.weebly.com



Replies:
Posted By: ron.d
Date Posted: 08 Nov 2019 at 12:31pm
There are drill bits and then again there are drill bits. Get decent ones, a set will be used more often than you think. First do the kiss test, align the head and tail stocks so the points of the dive and tail stock centres align.
Then slow the lathe down to a slowest speed, you will be using a fair sized bit and it will generate a surprising amount of heat.
Some turners do as I do and rub wax on the bit when its hot, helps to lubricate the drill and reduces friction. It may affect gluing if that is what you plan to do.
Advance the bit slowly, don't fproce it
Oh yes, slow the lathe down!
Ron



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Keep turning

web site http://bsewoodturningclub.onesuffolk.net


Posted By: Handcrafter
Date Posted: 08 Nov 2019 at 11:38pm
Thanks, Ron,
Sounds like good advice to me - thanks very much, I'll keep it in mind. 
Cheers
Michael


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Check out my stuff at www.michaelforsterwoodwork.weebly.com


Posted By: Dalboy
Date Posted: 09 Nov 2019 at 12:48am
When drilling the normal rule is the larger the bit the slower you need to drill small bits need a faster speed.


Posted By: Claude
Date Posted: 09 Nov 2019 at 2:04am
Slow speeds!  When I use a ~37mm Forstner bit to hollow out a block before I carve it (to insert an electric votive candle), I set my pillar drill to the slowest speed possible.  Gently press down on the handle, cut 3-6mm deep, then back out the bit to clear the chips.  I'm usually cutting into end grain, so I need to do it slowly...

Claude


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Posted By: Handcrafter
Date Posted: 11 Nov 2019 at 7:29am
Originally posted by Claude Claude wrote:

I set my pillar drill to the slowest speed possible.  Gently press down on the handle, cut 3-6mm deep, then back out the bit to clear the chips.  I'm usually cutting into end grain, so I need to do it slowly...

Claude
Thanks, Claude - sounds like eminently sensible advice to me, and I certainly intend to take it. Hoping to get a new lathe (Coronet Herald) this coming weekend, and also a few accessories including some decent but proportionate forstner bits, and then I'll be hoping to make some serious progress.



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Check out my stuff at www.michaelforsterwoodwork.weebly.com


Posted By: CHJ
Date Posted: 11 Nov 2019 at 1:06pm
One thing you can do if you have a lower power drill or want to reduce the large Forstner bit loads is to stage drill from small to large diameter.

As long as you take the trouble to open up with the final size bit deep enough to form a location register first you can then go up through the bit sizes, reducing the material removal each time, the staged bits may not stay perfectly centralised through the stages because they won't have a centre point location but this does not matter as long as you have the peripheral location for the final size bit.




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Chas.

http://quest42.co.uk/woodwork/html/page46.htm" rel="nofollow - Bits & Pieces Gallery


Posted By: Handcrafter
Date Posted: 11 Nov 2019 at 8:27pm
Originally posted by CHJ CHJ wrote:

One thing you can do if you have a lower power drill or want to reduce the large Forstner bit loads is to stage drill from small to large diameter.
That's a great idea - would take a lot of the load off the horizontal cutters. And presumably, using this technique on the lathe, the centring issue wouldn't arise as long as the headstock was firmly locked perfectly in line with the tailstock?



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Check out my stuff at www.michaelforsterwoodwork.weebly.com


Posted By: CHJ
Date Posted: 11 Nov 2019 at 9:26pm
Originally posted by Handcrafter Handcrafter wrote:

.... And presumably, using this technique on the lathe, the centring issue wouldn't arise as long as the headstock was firmly locked perfectly in line with the tailstock?...

You still get some misalignment of smaller bits at times dependant upon wood characteristics and stiffness of drill setup when they make their initial bite but as long as you have enough of a finished size depth to act as an alignment aid for the final size it does not matter, most Forstner bits have enough peripheral web to maintain alignment once cutting is under way.

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Chas.

http://quest42.co.uk/woodwork/html/page46.htm" rel="nofollow - Bits & Pieces Gallery


Posted By: ron.d
Date Posted: 12 Nov 2019 at 5:37pm
Ifyou are drilling on the lathe, stop at the size below the one you want and finish with a gouge
Ron


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Keep turning

web site http://bsewoodturningclub.onesuffolk.net



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