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More tapers

Printed From: Woodworkers Institute
Category: Woodturning
Forum Name: Gallery
Forum Description: Show the world what you've been turning
URL: http://www.woodworkersinstitute.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=22330
Printed Date: 19 Jan 2020 at 4:31am
Software Version: Web Wiz Forums 12.01 - http://www.webwizforums.com


Topic: More tapers
Posted By: CHJ
Subject: More tapers
Date Posted: 03 Nov 2019 at 2:42pm
Sumac and Beech, 120mm high X 87mm diameter.
Finished with CSS & buffed with Microcrystalline wax.
Basically just playing with more tapers for effect and highlight areas of control that need more attention.

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Chas.

http://quest42.co.uk/woodwork/html/page46.htm" rel="nofollow - Bits & Pieces Gallery



Replies:
Posted By: Pete in Welland
Date Posted: 03 Nov 2019 at 3:06pm
Chas I really like this whole concept especially the use of sumac which we have an over abundance of over here. Being super critical I think the only thing that lets it down from a turner's scrutiny is the glue joints between the staves and the top rim and base. I always use a skew long point cut and slightly undercut the two mating surfaces. The long point cut will produce a really sharp pristine corner and a clean glue line. Just my point of view and probably completely irrelevant from a customers point of view.
Pete

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http://peterdhyde.com/ - My New Site


Posted By: Dalboy
Date Posted: 03 Nov 2019 at 4:36pm
Very nice Chas, it is surprising how many configurations you can come up with when making these segmented pieces


Posted By: CHJ
Date Posted: 03 Nov 2019 at 6:09pm
Originally posted by Pete in Welland Pete in Welland wrote:

.. Being super critical I think the only thing that lets it down from a turner's scrutiny is the glue joints between the staves and the top rim and base. ...


This is something I'm studying at the moment Pete, they do show up more in the image than in natural light.

Close study under magnification shows that its alternate grain boundaries in the sumac that are very open pored that are predominantly the culprits, the glue is taking up the natural stain from the wood and where it penetrates the open pores it makes for an apparent wider glue line.

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Chas.

http://quest42.co.uk/woodwork/html/page46.htm" rel="nofollow - Bits & Pieces Gallery


Posted By: Pete in Welland
Date Posted: 05 Nov 2019 at 3:53pm
Try a coat of sanding sealer on the joint surfaces it might be just enough to stop the glue bleed. Sumac is such a striking wood and although we get rare 8" diameter logs most is in the 2-3" range and it grows anywhere. The species here is called Staghorn Sumac and wood colours vary from pale green to almost black. I've no idea how stable it is but suspect there will be some movement even when dry. Most pieces I've turned are small boxes and goblets with little distortion. I really like what you did with this series.
Pete

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http://peterdhyde.com/ - My New Site


Posted By: CHJ
Date Posted: 05 Nov 2019 at 5:39pm
Originally posted by Pete in Welland Pete in Welland wrote:

Try a coat of sanding sealer on the joint surfaces it might be just enough to stop the glue bleed. Sumac is such a striking wood and although we get rare 8" diameter logs most is in the 2-3" range and it grows anywhere. The species here is called Staghorn Sumac and wood colours vary from pale green to almost black. I've no idea how stable it is but suspect there will be some movement even when dry. Most pieces I've turned are small boxes and goblets with little distortion. I really like what you did with this series.
Pete
This is from a 'Staghorn variety' that came to the end of a useful life in my garden several years ago, main trunk was 170+mm (7").

Dried out to a quite soft relatively lightweight wood that takes a good finish but too me requires its incorporation into a 'construct' to add durability if it's likely to be subject to handling.

I have a couple of Glue-ups in progress at the moment and had already decided to try a sanding sealer & sanding dust fill or possibly thin CA adhesive on the joint face prior to final skim, the Sumac end grain is very open pored, excellent from a bonding point of view but not most conducive to clean continuous edge.

The alternate will be to experiment with the interface profile to disguise the pure end grain join.

I still have this piece to segment so might have cracked it by the time I've used this batch up.

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Chas.

http://quest42.co.uk/woodwork/html/page46.htm" rel="nofollow - Bits & Pieces Gallery


Posted By: Pete in Welland
Date Posted: 06 Nov 2019 at 2:51am
Chas end grain joints are always very week. The only glue that really bonds end grain is hot melt glue which would be a nightmare in this application. At the ends of your laminations you are gluing end grain to side grain which really flies in the face of good glue up practice because of wood movement and poor bonding to end grain. When I've done this same construction I always rabbet the joint so some side grain to side grain glue area is provided. I've never had any problems and if the end grain is sealed before the glue is applied there is no glue creep into the pores of the wood.

This egg is a jewellery box with a tray and ring holder inside. Principle woods are oak and cherry with black walnut features

The detail at the joint is 2 segmented rings of black walnut that had a rebate cut on the outside face and beaded and the inside of the shell was also rebated to make the glue joint. I used hot hide glue throughout the whole build which has over 900 pieces in it. Still holding together after 10 years.
Pete

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http://peterdhyde.com/ - My New Site


Posted By: CHJ
Date Posted: 06 Nov 2019 at 11:02pm
Pete, not obvious but likewise end grain joints are rebated or tenoned, not always large but enough to provide component alignment during glue-up and to try and negate poor end grain adhesion on dense woods can just be seen in some images where inner and outer layer thickness is different.

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Chas.

http://quest42.co.uk/woodwork/html/page46.htm" rel="nofollow - Bits & Pieces Gallery


Posted By: Pete in Welland
Date Posted: 08 Nov 2019 at 4:02pm
Just noticed it in the second picture Now where is all the sumac I stashed away about 10 years ago

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http://peterdhyde.com/ - My New Site



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