Free Standing Rack archive

Tuesday 12 August 2008

Alan Holtham builds this shelving and cupboard unit

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This bathroom storage rack is part of a suite of furniture for a modern bathroom, the wall cupboard having been featured last month. However, the design is so universal that it could be used equally well as a hallway unit or a display cabinet in the living room. In this case the timber requested by the clients was oak to match the rest of the bathroom, but I am always wary of using large pieces of solid material in an environment which is going to be subjected to such extremes of humidity. It is asking too much to expect wide panels to stay flat under such conditions, so where possible I use veneered board and lip the edges with solid material, though for the smaller-section material it is quite acceptable to use solid timber. To my mind veneered blockboard is better than veneered MDF, as although dearer it is stronger and much lighter in weight, as well as being totally stable and more pleasant to work. The downside of all these advantages is that all exposed edges need to be lipped, and you have to work it carefully to avoid chipping the very thin veneer.


David Preece

Tagged In:

Alan Holtham , Rack , Shelves , Cupboard

Glossary Rollover a term to view its definition

Compound Mitre Saw , Planer Thicknesser , Router

"My preference for finish is a coat of clear finishing oil"


Horizontal Router Table

There is a lot of grooving and jointing work involved in this project and for this I prefer to use a home-made horizontal routing table. I have always found this to be much easier and more accurate to use than a vertical table, though of course they both have definite uses. For grooving you cannot beat the accessibility and visibility of cutting the material with it flat on the table, and if you think ahead a bit and cut all the grooves that have to match up before you change any settings, then it will all line up effortlessly at the final assembly stage. Such a table is dead easy to make and over the years will more than repay the time involved in its construction.